A very special gift....

Written by Sarah Dilley on 24 June 2014

I have recently had the pleasure of working with a lovely lady to create a bespoke pair of 9ct rose gold and yellow cufflinks, inspired by George the 5th Halfpenny coin, as a very special present for her husband. It was really important the design incorporated the halfpenny, as this had a very personal link to the family, so we worked to create a design would not only capture the coin design, but would reference a special year in their lives. This beautiful design has circular 9ct rose gold plates, with engraved detailing, with 9ct yellow gold hinge backs, so that they can be worn safely with confidence, on any special occasion.

White and Rose Gold Coin inspired cufflinks  

A little bit of history about the coin...

George the 5th Halfpenny was in circulation for the whole rein of George the 5th from 1922 to 1937, showing King George's head on one side, with Latin around, which reads, 'George V by the Grace of God King of all Britons, Defender of the Faith and Emperor of India' and the on the reverse, Britannia seated, and the words 'Half Penny'.

Until 1971 there were two hundred and forty pence in one pound sterling. Twelve pence made a shilling, and twenty shillings made a pound. Values less than a pound were usually written in terms of shillings and pence, so forty-two pence would be three shillings and six pence (3/6), pronounced 'three and six'. Values of less than a shilling were simply written in terms of pence so, eight pence would be 8d. So Half a penny would have been recorded as 1/2d! So how much is half penny in today's money? It is thought that it would be roughly around 2-3p.

A little bit of information on the origins of the design...

The original design of the Half Penny, showing Britannia seated, was designed by Leonard Charles Wyon, who was an engraver, and is also known for his design work on the gold and silver coinage that was created to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee in 1887, as well as his work on head portrait, which she has a bun in 1860.

A little bit of information on engraving...

So, engraving has been practices for many years, and here at Harriet Kelsall Bespoke Jewellery, we are very keen to keep the tradition of hand engraving alive, engravers today still use a variety of different hardened steel tool called a burin or graver’s, to cut the design into the surface of the metal, to create beautiful and detailed designs, just like these George the 5th Halfpenny coin cufflinks.

Find out more about these bespoke cufflinks