What Minerals do Gemstones Come From

What Minerals do Gemstones Come From

Written by on 9 August 2013

This article will take you through the three most precious and valuable gemstones seen in jewellery to date. We will be exploring diamonds, rubies and sapphires and emeralds.

Every day we have the pleasure to work with an array of such beautiful gemstones, and are lucky enough you see some really unusual types of stones alongside colours and quality of gemstones to. It always fascinates me as to how these have be produced through our earth throughout 1000’s of years to create a stones which we take real pride in wearing for the rest of our lives and to be passed down to generations to come, these stones have a vat history before it enters into a piece of jewellery.

So to begin with:

What is a mineral?

A mineral is a substance that is found within the earth’s and is naturally occurring under the earth’s high temperatures, which create a definite natural crystal structure to the gemstone. Minerals are commonly found and produces via molten, magma caused by volcanic eruptions where the mineral water is divided and held in confined spaces. These with the heat and temperature over 1000’s of years create our gorgeous natural gemstones we see today. It is very rare to see such a large mineral found within the earth’s layer so if these are discovered and fine enough quality to cut into a precious gemstone then this become as very costly and rare cut stone to come across. There are around 4000 minerals found in the world across various locations and many are extremely rare, the most common are, Sulfieds, Oxides, Nitrates Phosphates, sulates and silicates. Minerals are always made up of several minerals merging together to create a specific gemstone or even a specific metal to. The formation of the landscape and the development of this will very much change what is produced within the earth layer, this rock affect by the land difference in formation can produce such wonders like gold, marble and the wonderful granite. Diamonds are found in varying colours and degrees of whiteness to, if more carbon atoms are found then this means the colour of the diamond would be whiter however if there are less carbon atoms this means than nitrogen has been able to fill where the atoms are missing causing the lower grade colour of diamonds and are more of a yellowish brownish tint to them, this is also the reason for our fancy colour diamond to, the nitrogen is replaced by other

Diamonds

Diamond engagement rings are the most popular sold and certainly lives up to saying ‘they are a girl’s best friend’ diamonds are one of the most fascinating gemstones found making them the most popular stone within the jewellery industry, with an internal reflection creating such a beautiful sparkle. Diamonds are the hardest mineral found of earth and are made up of lots of carbon atoms which are merged together under the earth’s layer these minerals are found in very few locations, such as Canada, Indian, Brazil and Australia. These carbon atoms not only create the strong structure a diamond has but found alongside this is graphite, the structure of graphic is so different this explains why this is soft enough to use as a pencil led. It’s amazing how different two minerals can be within the same area.

Diamonds are usual formed and are raised up to the service via volcanic pipes where the diamond is seen to go through extreme temperature and pressure at this time. The diamond is brought up to the surface via
Kimblerlite pipes and other rocks which are found deep within the earth’s layer, these are also found alongside alluvial deposits which commonly find quartz corundum zircon.

Diamonds are found in varying colours and degrees of whiteness to, if more carbon atoms are found then this means the colour of the diamond would be whiter however if there are less carbon atoms this means than nitrogen has been able to fill where the atoms are missing causing the lower grade colour of diamonds and are more of a yellowish brownish tint to them. These are all very carefully considered when mined for their rough and its crucial the stones cutters analyse the rough to make the most of the diamonds they cut.

Rubies and Sapphires

Rubies and sapphires are found within the same region and are similar in composition. Rubies have a beautiful intense deep red and will have traces of chromium which makes the ruby its vibrant colour. Sapphires also found within the same area as rubies, these will display the same hardness as rubies; however sapphires are found in a wider variety of colours from the deep right royal blue, to organs, yellows purples and may more. When an array of coloured sapphire found it is evident these particular stones will show traces of iron, titanium, and chromium also. Rubies and sapphires are equally as popular within the jewellery industry due to its hardness coming in at 9 one behind diamond and the extreme varieties of availabilities in colours.

Emerald

Emeralds are equally as popular as the above gemstones and are among the three that are the most popular for jewellery due to the gorgeous vibrant green in colour this gemstone displays. The main composition found within an emerald will show traces of chromium and vanadium. Emerald like every other gemstone will grow one molecule at a time and will need to grow within a hydrothermal vein which will have occurred from magma fluids deep within the earth’s crust. Emeralds displays a lovely vibrant green in colour however are one of the softest gemstones around due to the way these binding of the above, these are commonly mined in the regions of Colombia, Brazil, and Zambia. Emeralds are the form of the beryl family, which includes the blue variety of beryl aquamarine, which is composed of beryllium, aluminium, silcon and oxygen to make such a beautiful ocean blue.

So when you look into your precious jewellery think back to where your jewellery first began all those 1000’s of years ago.